When your reinforcers don’t work….

When your reinforcers don’t work….

Walks with my dog are for HER enjoyment.  I love them, but my agenda stays at home.  So we “go for a bumble” (Helen Philips of Clicker Gun Dog Centre), just wandering around with no real goal in mind.  As long as she does not pull (or go somewhere unsafe) she is free to sniff and wander to her nose and brain’s content.  Most days it is a good combination of walking and sniffing.  Once day we we spent the whole hour in the parking lot of our local park.  She loved it and was exhausted when we were done. 

Today Tara chooses a completely different route than ever before when we walk out of our home.

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Cues or Commands?

Cues or Commands?

It may seem like semantics, but here are my brief thoughts on the topic.  Dog trainers are not perfect, and this is the story of Kelly Keeney, the frustrated dog owner.  I think it will illustrate clearly why semantics matter and how it can change your outlook on training.  

I do not like living in a house where dogs bark at every little thing.  It makes my brain go crazy.

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Dog’s Point of View – Why won’t you just stop pulling???

Dog’s Point of View – Why won’t you just stop pulling???

Thanks to Jennifer Anderson for her question.  “Why is my dog willing to choke himself to death by pulling me the entire walk, instead of avoiding what can’t be comfortable and just walk like normal!”  

This is a very common question among dog owners.  When we look at it from the dog’s point of view we can sometimes see why they they may choose pulling as the best behavior to do on leash.  

First we have to think “What is the DOG getting out of pulling?”

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Dog’s Point of View DEMAND BARKING

Dog’s Point of View DEMAND BARKING

Typically, the behaviors we see our dog use most frequently are the ones that we have TAUGHT our dog, whether we did so consciously or unconsciously.  Once you realize what purpose the behavior serves in the dogs eyes, it  will become easier to make them stronger or make them go away.

Consider these two scenarios:  Your young son wants $5.00 to go out with friends and get pizza at the corner.  If you were an 11 year old, which response (consequence/result) would you prefer…

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When your reinforcers don’t work….

Walks with my dog are for HER enjoyment.  I love them, but my agenda stays at home.  So we “go for a bumble” (Helen Philips of Clicker Gun Dog Centre), just wandering around with no real goal in mind.  As long as she does not pull (or go somewhere unsafe) she is free to sniff and wander to her nose and brain’s content.  Most days it is a good combination of walking and sniffing.  Once day we we spent the whole hour in the parking lot of our local park.  She loved it and was exhausted when we were done. 

Today Tara chooses a completely different route than ever before when we walk out of our home.

Cues or Commands?

It may seem like semantics, but here are my brief thoughts on the topic.  Dog trainers are not perfect, and this is the story of Kelly Keeney, the frustrated dog owner.  I think it will illustrate clearly why semantics matter and how it can change your outlook on training.  

I do not like living in a house where dogs bark at every little thing.  It makes my brain go crazy.

Dog’s Point of View – Why won’t you just stop pulling???

Thanks to Jennifer Anderson for her question.  “Why is my dog willing to choke himself to death by pulling me the entire walk, instead of avoiding what can’t be comfortable and just walk like normal!”  

This is a very common question among dog owners.  When we look at it from the dog’s point of view we can sometimes see why they they may choose pulling as the best behavior to do on leash.  

First we have to think “What is the DOG getting out of pulling?”

About Compassionate Canine Training

Compassionate Canine focuses on using positive (R+) training to solve the real frustrations of families who live with the training challenges of daily life distractions. 

Contact Us

(732) 930-1364

Kelly@compassiondog.com